Forget Trial And Error; Take Our Tube Bending Course

Posted by Alecia Robinson on Tue, Oct 10, 2017 @ 15:10 PM

Acquire the skills that will save time, save money and increase system efficiency


TubeBending.jpg

Edmonton Valve has been offering a variety of courses over the years, from teaching about fitting installation to improving sampling system performance, we've got you covered. Download our free training catalogue today and find a training class to suit your teams development.

Training & Education


What do valves, fittings, gauges and most other Swagelok components have in common? They need tubing in order to be of any use in a fluid system. Without tubing, all you'd have is a pile of parts.

It's vital, then, to understand how to handle tubing, plan a route for it, cut the correct length of tubing and bend it accurately.

There's not need to learn by trial and error. There's no need to wonder if your co-workers are passing along any bad habits if you rely on them to show you want to do. Rely instead on Edmonton Valve & Fitting. Our four-hour Tube Bending Essentials class on tube bending will show you what you need to know. With guidance from a certified expert, you'll learn how to consistently make optimal tube bends, and do the work efficiently.

What we cover

We start at the beginning: How to handle tubing without damaging it. We'll show you how to properly cut and debur the tubing as well as how to bend it. You'll learn how to calculate the length of tubing you need to get from Point A to Point B. That's especially important when you are using expansion loops and offsets, which we'll also cover.

Good craftsmanship not only saves money by reducing the amount of expensive scrap, it also improves fluid system performance.

The course has hand-on exercises as well as classroom instruction, so you'll be able to practice what you just learned. 

Who should attend

Anyone who has to install tubing can benefit from this course: fabricators, contractors and technicians. But it's also valuable knowledge for people who design fluid systems: engineers and draftsmen. Anyone responsible for inspecting or maintaining a fluid system also needs to know if the job was done right: quality control personnel and safety engineers.

Tube Bending Essentials is only one of many classes that we offer. You can contact us through the linked page to sign up for the next class in our new training center, or we can bring the class to your location. If you prefer to talk with a live person, we're at 780-437-0640.


Additional resources

Topics: Training, Value Added Services, local expert, Tubing

Meet Mike Taylor

Posted by Alecia Robinson on Wed, Oct 04, 2017 @ 10:10 AM

His earlier career with a puck helped break the ice with our customers


Mike.Closeup.2.jpg

You've probably seen Mike Taylor's name on the blog before and now you get to find out about the man himself.


Job titles don't always give a complete picture of what a person does. Take Mike Taylor, who is officially one of our account managers in sales and service. Most of the time he manages accounts for valves and fittings, but he also wears a few other hats.

For instance, we've flown him all over North America to conduct energy audits for clients. He's been trained on hose advisory services, too. In fact he's done a variety of jobs in his 16 years with Edmonton Valve.

Like most of our staff, Taylor started in the warehouse picking parts for orders and getting familiar with our inventory. Then he helped us start our mobile inventory management service. Taylor was in charge of building the routes and schedules. After managing mobile inventory for a while, he moved over to customer service for a few years.

A sales territory opened up when longtime associate Jim Begg moved over to the training side of the business, and Taylor move into Begg's old job.

"I don't call him Jim; I always call him Mr. Begg," Taylor says. "He did such a terrific job of managing that territory that I got really lucky taking over."

Second career

Even though Taylor joined us fresh out of college at age 22, this is his second career. The first was as a midget hockey player. He started out playing for his hometown Medicine Hat Tigers, and finished up his playing career with Bonnyville.

How does a person move from hockey to valves and fittings? Well, his father owned a steel company in Medicine Hat, so Taylor grew up with some knowledge of how industrial companies work. His brother started an engineering company. When Taylor was ready to pick up his college diploma and start a sales career, he asked his brother to name the best companies to approach. The list was short: only four names, and at the top of the list was Edmonton Valve.

"I pulled in to Edmonton Valve to drop off my resume at the front door," Taylor recalls. "They don't normally take an interview from somebody who drops off a resume, but somebody had canceled that day." He ended up talking with company president Keith Johns, and soon was on board.

Transferable skills

Playing hockey gave Taylor an unusual advantage when came to work for us. When he started our mobile inventory fleet, he took care of the western side of Alberta.

"I had played in a lot of those towns, and a lot of the Junior Hockey teams are supported by corporate donations. A lot of the donors are oil and gas companies," Taylor says. " When I started with the mobile truck, I ran into a lot of people who supported teams I played for or against."

It was a great way to break the ice, so to speak.

We've received some dividends from hockey too. For the past 12 years Edmonton Valve has been part of a yearly industrial hockey tournament. Taylor has helped run things both at the team and tournament levels. It's a great chance for him to work with some of our customers in a relaxed setting where they can get to know one another better.

Not surprisingly, Taylor is also one of the top scorers in Edmonton Valve's lunchtime hockey games. But having already proved his talents in midget hockey, Taylor sees it more as an opportunity to have fun.

Taylor lives south of Edmonton in the compact community of Beaumont. His neighbors include a couple of other Edmonton Valve associates, and their children have grown up as friends.

"They have been raised by the culture of Edmonton Valve, which is a highly respectful company that takes care of their employees and their families," Taylor says. "My family has always been floored and amazed by the understanding and generosity that Keith Johns has always had toward family."


Additional resources


In a hurry or have a question? Please click here to get in touch - we respond fast! Or call 780.437.0640.


 

Topics: People

STEM Learning Gets Supersonic Boost From Swagelok

Posted by Alecia Robinson on Thu, Sep 28, 2017 @ 14:09 PM

An attempt to set a new land speed record inspires students in the classroom


 bloodhound.jpgSwagelok is partnering with a Northeast Ohio school district to bring access to BLOODHOUND-themed STEM education programs, watch the video here.


Teachers in Hudson, Ohio, have a great tool for pepping up math and science lessons for fourth-graders: a supersonic car called the Bloodhound.

The Bloodhound is a British-built attempt to set a new land speed record. Swagelok parts are crucial in the car's hydraulics, and especially the brakes. (Good brakes are important in any car, but especially one designed to reach speeds of up to 1,600 km/h.)

So two years ago, Swagelok approached Hudson Superintendent Phil Herman to see if the district would be interested in exploring science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) content available through Swagelok's work on the Bloodhound. Through a series of meetings and brainstorming session, the school decided that fourth graders would make an ideal audience.

High-powered learning

“We examined the Bloodhound STEM content through the lens of project-based learning and then reflected on what essential questions could be posed to incorporate the content,” says Christina Wooley, PK-12 curriculum coordinator, Hudson City School District.

Throughout the 2016-2017 school year, two teams of fourth-grade teachers have integrated Bloodhound lessons across a wide range of subjects: earth, physical and life sciences; physics; chemistry; language arts; social studies; and English. The program ends with the students designing, building and racing Bloodhound model rocket cars.

Take a look

You can see the excitement in the kids' faces in this five-minute video from Swagelok

"The education side of the project is paramount. If we build the car and just went racing but didn't inspire anybody, I don't think the project would have the value that it has now," says Tony Parraman, sponsor liaison with Bloodhound SSC.

The Bloodhound gives the students' imaginations a big boost. As curriculum coordinator Christina Wooley put it, a typical science lab would give the students a series of steps to follow, and that's that. With the Bloodhound as a focus, students can explore in many different directions.

They also get to see how problems are tackled in the real world.

"I liked the design and building part, how you can design something on paper, and then if it doesn't work you can start over," says one student in the video. In other words, making mistakes is a normal part of learning, and it's not a reason to give up when tackling a problem.

Inspired learning at East Woods School 

“We are so grateful to Swagelok for bringing Hudson students this inspirational learning opportunity,” says Phil Herman, superintendent of the Hudson City School District. “I’ve seen first-hand how our students light up with enthusiasm when they’re solving a STEM challenge tied to Bloodhound.”

Swagelok's role on the car

The gigantic Bloodhound is more than 13 meters long and weighs 7.7 metric tons. It has three engines generating a combined 135,000 horsepower: a jet engine, a rocket engine, and a V8 just to run the fuel pump.

Swagelok components will be relied on to open air brake doors after the rocket car reaches its top speed, and for final breaking below 600 km/h. The company’s products will also play a vital role in the safety of the fueling system and re-fueling rig. Swagelok products on the car include 60 series ball valves and RL series relief valves, QC and QF quick connects, tubing, gauges, hoses, and tube fittings.

You may not be working on a supersonic car, but Edmonton Valve & Fitting can still help get your next fluid system project up to speed. Set up an appointment through our website or call us at 780.437.0640.


Additional resources

Topics: Training, Value Added Services

A Look At Swagelok's Medium Pressure Valves

Posted by Alecia Robinson on Wed, Sep 20, 2017 @ 09:09 AM

Good for demanding applications that don't require high-pressure components


F10 Series Valve.jpg

The F10 Series of valves can handle up to 10 000 psig, making it one of our most popular medium-pressure valves. Download the Medium- and High- Pressure Fittings Catalogue to find out about the various medium pressure valves we offer.


If we caught your interest in our medium-pressure fittings, chances are you'll also want to learn about Swagelok medium-pressure valves. We carry various types: needle valves, ball valves, relief valves, and double block and bleed valves.

In the oil and gas industry, this is often where you'll turn for demanding applications such as:

  • Oil and gas
  • Wellhead control panels
  • Hydraulic control panels
  • Grease injector units
  • Blowout preventers
  • Chemical injection skids

It's important to check pressure ratings, as there can be some overlap in the ranges as you move from low-pressure to medium-pressure to high-pressure components.

For example, our F10 Series forged-body needle valves are rated for working pressures of up to 10,000 psig (689 bar). Other medium-pressure valves may be rated for working pressures of up to 20,000 psig (1378 bar).

A closer look

A single blog post doesn't lend itself to listing all the details of each type of valve, so for today let's focus on the popular F10 Series needle valves. In addition to their pressure ratings, they also can handle temperatures of up to 204°C with PTFE packing, and up to 454°C with graphite packing.

We offer these needle valves in straight, angle, and oblique configurations. All have half-inch female NPT outlets.

The valves can stand up to pressure thanks to the forged body of F316 or F316L stainless steel. On request, Swagelok can also make them from carbon steel and 25Cr super duplex stainless. The stem threads are cold rolled for high strength and smooth operation. A stainless steel shroud protects the threads against dirt and dust.

Thanks to a two-piece knuckle, the needle won't rotate with the stem. The joint is located above the packing, protected from system media.

Every Swagelok F10 series valve assembly is factory tested hydrostatically. A shell test is performed at 1.5 times maximum rated working pressure, and a seat test is performed at 1.1 times maximum rated working pressure.

A few options

For extra safety, our F10 series valves can be ordered with anti-tamper handles and keys to reduce the risk of human error or tampering. We also offer a stainless steel round lockable handles that can lock the valve in any position (though it is available only on straight valves and angle-pattern valves).

We can tell you more about all our medium-pressure components if you'll give us a call at 780.437.0640 or contact us through our website.


Additional resources


 

Topics: Valves

ABSA and MTRs: We Have Your Parts Covered Part 2

Posted by Alecia Robinson on Tue, Sep 12, 2017 @ 15:09 PM

We have documentation for components for systems running at more than 15 psi


DSC_0232.jpg

Need an MTR for one of your Edmonton Valve orders? Head over to edmontonvalve.com/mtrs to download a copy, all you need is the heat number which is stamped right on your tubing.


As we discussed in an earlier post about ABSA and CRNs, the Alberta Boiler Safety Association is the pressure equipment safety authority authorized by the Alberta Government to administer and delivery safety programs related to boilers, pressure vessels and pressure piping systems through their complete life cycles. In this weeks blog we will discuss how ABSA relates to Swagelok when it comes to Material Test Reports (MTRs).

Documentation

For threaded piping and tubing, ABSA suggests that owner companies have certain procurement and purchasing requirements from its approved vendor list. Although Material Test Reports may not be required by construction code, MTRs may be required in owner specification. So it's up to the owner to train personnel in the MTR verification and other documentation requirements

MTRs and CoCs

Edmonton Valve & Fitting can help out by providing documentation. We provide MTRs for all tubing orders. They are based on the heat number printed on the lay line of the tubing. We also have a self-serve option available for MTRs for tubing online at edmontonvalve.com/mtrs. Simply enter the heat number and you can download the MTR. If you are cutting the tubing, then the heat number should be written onto the tubing

MTRs are typically not provided with other products, but they are available on request. All parts are traceable for alloy materials with a three-letter heat code that is stamped onto all fitting components which meets the ABSA requirement. It speeds up the process if you request the MTR at the time of order.  Keep in mind that a tubing tee could have up to 10 MTRs associated with it.

Another commonly requested document we receive is a Certificate of Compliance. We can provide a Certificate of Compliance upon request, just mention this request when speaking to your customer service associate.  A CoC will be issued for the entire order, and parts are listed out.


Additional resources


In a hurry or have a question? Please click here to get in touch - we respond fast! Or call 780.437.0640.


 

Topics: Online Services, local expert, Tubing, Resources

Visit Our Booth at the Oil Sands Trade Show

Posted by Alecia Robinson on Wed, Sep 06, 2017 @ 09:09 AM

Here's a chance to get your hands on some of our products in Fort McMurray


Swagelok Helping hand fb.jpg

Stop by booth 3317 at the 2017 Oil Sands Trade Show and Conference to see your local Swagelok associates and learn about our product offerings. You can register to attend the show for free by using code OST2K.


We'll be on hand to show off some of our Swagelok components, as well as the skills of our Custom Solutions department in creating various assemblies.

While Swagelok made its name with tube fittings, the company also makes many larger scale products for process piping, typically anything with less than a two-inch diameter. Take a look at some of our flanges and valves at our booth.

Then let us show you our grab sample modules. We've written about them before on our blog. You'll get a chance to see the various options in person, twist some handles and otherwise satisfy your curiosity.

If you don't feel like conversation, we'll have some videos to watch too.

Where to find us

You can find us in the Turnarounds & Maintenance Zone, look for booth 3317 in Hall C. Account Manager Andrew Worthington will be in the booth so you can find a knowledgeable fluid system expert any time from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on September 12th and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on September 13th.

It's one thing to look at our products online. It's another to physically put your hands on it and have a face-to-face conversation with someone who knows the product well.

So stop by, say hello, and gather some free information and expertise from your Swagelok experts. Register to attend the show for free using code OST2K.


Additional resources


In a hurry or have a question? Please click here to get in touch - we respond fast! Or call 780.437.0640.


 

Topics: Q&A, Sample Systems, Custom Solutions, Events

New Training Centre Has Plenty Of Room For Learning

Posted by Alecia Robinson on Wed, Aug 30, 2017 @ 08:08 AM

We've doubled our seating capacity, and there's even room to serve lunch


New Training Lecture Room.jpg

As Edmonton Valve & Fitting continues to expand our training offerings we have also needed to expand our space. The lecture room, pictured above, is just one of the improvements found at the new facility. Sign up for one of our upcoming training sessions and check out the new training centre.

Training & Education


Training classes have long been an important service of Edmonton Valve & Fitting. Even the best components can't do their job well unless they are installed and maintained properly in a well designed fluid system.

Originally we conducted training right in our headquarters office. Eventually we needed more space, so for the past few years we have been renting a place down the block. Lately even that hasn't been big enough, so this year we built out a new venue specifically designed for our training classes.

Plenty of room

Our new training centre can handle up to 24 people at a time. We outfitted it with dual projection screens and two glass whiteboards for presentations. All of the tables have built-in power outlets, so attendees can charge a smart phone or plug in a laptop computer without hunting for a wall outlet.

In addition to the main training area, we have a board room and two offices up front. We can have our sales meetings there even while training is being conducted in the other room.

Until now, everyone had to come back to our headquarters when we stopped at mid-day for lunch; now we can serve them right in the training centre's lunch room.

We also have a "hands on" room (pictured below) we can use for teaching people how to bend tubing. That means we can conduct two training sessions at once.

New HandsOn Room.jpg

Light and airy

For too many people, attending a training class means being stuck in a stuffy, cramped room all day under dreary fluorescent light. We wanted to create a space more conducive to learning. We went with an open-ceiling concept and bright LED lighting. So it's environmentally friendly as well as being more comfortable.

For our first session in the new building we scheduled our Swagelok Total Support training for Sept. 7. We have many more classes in the pipeline, including the two-day Sampling System Problem Solving & Maintenance course in November. Check out our Training and Education page, and then get ready to learn in a bright new setting.


Additional resources


In a hurry or have a question? Please click here to get in touch - we respond fast! Or call 780.437.0640.


 

Topics: Training, Value Added Services, local expert

Seal Support Simplified: Call Edmonton Valve & Fitting

Posted by Alecia Robinson on Wed, Aug 23, 2017 @ 09:08 AM

API 682 tells you what you need; we'll customize it, build it fast, and warranty it


IMG_4055c.jpg

Whether you are in need of single seal, dual seals, quench seals or gas seals, we've got you covered. Edmonton Valve can build seal support systems based off API Standard 682 and customize the designs to suit your system needs.

Seal Support Download


Most plants have centrifugal or rotary pumps. Those pumps have seals to protect their shafts. How can you make sure those seals last a long time? You could start from scratch and plan out a system of tubing, valves, drains and filters. But thanks to the American Petroleum Institute, you don't have to. The trade association has come up Standard 682, a list of dozens of piping plans recommended for shaft sealing systems on centrifugal and rotary pumps.

If you have a setup with a single seal, dual seals, quench seals or gas seals, API Standard 682 probably has you covered.

Let's say you have a pump in high-temperature service, and you want to reduce the fluid temperature to cool the seal or increase the fluid vapor margin. Go to Plan 21, and you'll see how to set up a system with a single seal, cooling unit, temperature indicator, vents and a drain.

Or you may have something more complex in mind, involving hazardous or toxic fluids. The API suggests Plan 52, a dual-seal setup where the outboard seal acts as a safety backup for the primary seal.

If you have a situation where you need an abrasives separator, an external flush stream, pressurized seals, unpressurized seals or a host of other factors, there's probably an API 682 plan that covers the situation.

We make it even easier

But you don't even have to go to the trouble of building a seal support system to API specs, because Edmonton Valve & Fitting can do it for you. Our seal support systems are fully assembled locally. We can make sure you are using the best plan for your situation, get the work done fast, and warranty the completed assembly. You can order the whole assembly with a single part number.

We can even customize the configuration. Some seal manufacturers will sell you a support system, but their primary interest is in selling the seal itself. You'll have to take the support system as it comes, and somehow make it fit into your site. At Edmonton Valve & Fitting, however, we will take the time to produce a layout that works for you — maybe tall and skinny, maybe low and wide — so that you don't have an odd piece of equipment sticking out where it make become an inconvenience or even a safety hazard.

Because we have deep expertise in assembling fluid system components, you'll get high reliability and quality and consistent performance.

Which API 682 plan is right for you? We'll help you find out if you contact us through our website or call us 780-437-0640.


Additional resources


 

Topics: local expert, Custom Solutions

Strength and Simplicity: Medium Pressure Fittings

Posted by Alecia Robinson on Tue, Aug 15, 2017 @ 14:08 PM

They handle extra pressure without requiring any extra tools or extra effort


Medium pressure fittings.jpg

When you need a robust fitting that can handle up to 20 000 psig with an easy installation, Swagelok medium pressure fittings are a great solution. Download the Medium- and High- Pressure Fittings Catalogue to find out more.


Earlier this year we wrote about Swagelok's IPT fittings for high-pressure applications. But maybe you are looking or something that takes less time to install and can be verified for proper installation. For pressures that don't go beyond 20,000 psig (1378 bar), consider Swagelok's line of medium-pressure fittings.

With our medium-pressure fittings, you don't need any special tools or special skills. You don't have to cut threads or cone the ends of the tubing, as you would for the high-pressure fittings.

The simple two-piece design of Swagelok's medium-pressure tube fittings and adapters consists of a female fitting body and preassembled cartridge containing the male nut and color-coded front and back ferrules on a disposable plastic arbor. The preassembled cartridge ensures that installers will have the correct ferrule orientation, plus visual confirmation when the ferrule is present and properly installed in the female body.

The components are released only after the nut is threaded finger-tight on the fitting body.

Key differences

While Swagelok's medium-pressure fittings don't require special tools or skills, their installation differs from standard Swagelok fittings in a few key areas. 

First, it takes only one full turn to pull up the fitting, not the turn-and-a-quarter of our standard fitting. Second, proper tightening can be measured by torque as well as with our gap-measuring gauge. That means this is one of the very few components in the Swagelok catalog that can be mixed into your fluid system without having to upgrade all the fittings at once.

In our medium-pressure line we have straight fittings, 90-degree elbows, tees and union crosses, plus caps and plugs.

The strain-hardened stainless steel bodies offer lightweight space-saving designs. You'll also get Swagelok's patented low-temperature case hardening processing of the ferrules and nut.

Your fluid system needs to run on the right pressure for the job, and you need the right fittings for the pressure. Edmonton Valve & Fitting can make sure you get the right match. Call us at 780-437-0640 or contact us through our website.


Additional resources


 

Topics: Catalogues, Fittings

ABSA and CRNs: We Have Your Parts Covered

Posted by Alecia Robinson on Wed, Aug 09, 2017 @ 10:08 AM

We have documentation for components for systems running at more than 15 psi


CRN Database.jpg

The Edmonton Valve MTR website not only hosts our extensive list of MTRs you can also search for CRN Statutory Declarations. Pictured above is the list of our statutory declarations on our self-serve website which can be found at edmontonvalve.com/mtrs.

GET IN TOUCH


If you have a fluid system running at more that 15 psi, you probably have heard of the Alberta Boiler Safety Association. ABSA is the pressure equipment safety authority authorized by the Alberta Government to administer and delivery safety programs related to boilers, pressure vessels and pressure piping systems through their complete life cycles. ABSA is also responsible for the certification of pressure welders, inspectors and power engineers for the operation of a power or heating boiler.

When you go over that 15-psi threshold, ABSA mandates that all the components must have Canadian Registration Numbers. That's one of the reasons why our customers can relax when they order Swagelok products. Swagelok has a team that proactively manages our CRNs and ensures that they are regularly reviewed and kept up to date. With hundreds of CRNs, this is no small task.  Our current project to renew all of our CRNs is a 4 year program, with year one set up for planning and then the product submissions staggered out of years 2, 3 and 4.

CRN and Statutory Declarations

CRNs and Statutory Declarations are issued by the province. The Statutory Declaration is the document issued upon acceptance of the CRN by ABSA in Alberta,  and other local authorities in the rest of Canada. We can provide Statutory Declarations at no charge and can be found on our MTR site at edmontonvalve.com/mtrs.

A typical Statutory Declaration will include a cover page and backing documents on the product lines covered, including pressure ranges and product catalogues.

Lunch and learn

While most reputable companies know the basics, a few common questions come up. A couple of times a year, Edmonton Valve & Fitting will bring someone in for a lunch-and-learn session to cover topics such as what to do when an ABSA inspector comes to a site. 


Additional resources


In a hurry or have a question? Please click here to get in touch - we respond fast! Or call 780.437.0640.


 

Topics: Online Services, local expert